Tag Archives: Art Gallery

Salcombe Regatta – Paintings by Ric W. Horner

The UK coastline is one of the most beautiful in Europe and has a huge number of sailing towns that range from rocky and scenic to stylish and dramatic. It’s destinations are known to, and admired by many visitors from around the world. You just can’t beat the rugged cliffs and lush green landscape of England, which is unofficially the ‘home of sailing’ and it has a long and glorious tradition of boat building and for rearing fine sailors. Salcombe on the South Devon coast is particular scenic with lovely spots for sailing traditional boats and classic yachts.

Salcombe dusk

It is situated at the southern end of the Salcombe Estuary; the estuary is, in fact, a ria which is a landlocked, salt water inlet, with stunning beaches. The town is also known for its outstanding views, rolling surrounding countryside, breath-taking natural beauty, sparkling turquoise waters and rugged cliffs. Once a major port for the fruit trade, Salcombe has now found fame as a safe haven for family holidays. The Salcombe Town Regatta takes place every year for one week in late July/early August. This year it will be on from 3rd – 10th August 2024 and many visitors and yachtsmen are expected.

Ric has recently created a range of striking greeting cards made from his original paintings of Salcombe, who were initially produced between 2017 and 2018 for the Tonic Gallery (at the time based in Island Street). Sadly, this arrangement has come to an end now, however the gallery is still operating from a different location. (tonicgallery.co.uk)

Below is Ric’s Salcombe Greeting Card Collection. They are £42.00 for 12 and can be ordered via the link above, or by clicking on the images.

Sailing around the UK will get you out of the crowded Solent and into waters further afield. This adventure involves open-ocean and much more offshore-orientated sailing, which may mean rougher weather and more challenging conditions. Ilfracombe in North Devon and Bardsey Island in North Wales for example are far more open to the elements as they catch the Atlantic ocean swells to a greater extent than places further South. This means bigger waves and longer and sandy beaches.

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Some of the large, stormy paintings that were in the exhibition at Tonic gallery are still available. Please view the front page for more details. If you are a retailer and interested in stocking some of Ric’s cards, get in touch. Alternatively, you can also order a catalogue to view the whole range of cards on offer.

Salcombe Harbour, 26 x 26cm, oil on canvas – available

Many thanks.

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Salcombe Tonic Gallery

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Artist working on Whitstable Beach

It’s now 11 years that Ric W. Horner has lived in the late Dan Sherrin’s (1869 – 1940) quirky cottage on The Saxon Shore Way in Whitstable,  a long-distance footpath in England, which starts at Gravesend, Kent, and traces the coast of South-East England for 163 miles in total. He is one in a long line of artists , writers and novelists that made the town their home, for reasons such as the gorgeous light and stunning sunsets. 

Ric focuses in his work on the elemental qualities of open space, the energy of weather and the expressive frequencies of light. Over time Ric has recorded the dynamic changes in weather, atmosphere and cloud formations that one sees in this area, focusing predominantly on the views across the Swale Estuary towards the Isle of Sheppey. 

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Artist Dan Sherrin was an artist that could not be missed about the town, as he insisted on wearing the most outrageously chequer plus-fours and his love of beer was legendary. Dan was also a famous self-publicist of the most humorous kind, a practical joker who not only poked fun at those in authority – he even built his own airplane and created a spoof fire brigade!  

One of his paintings still hangs in Buckingham Palace, as he was once commissioned by King George V. Furthermore. An elderly neighbour who lived nearby in Preston Parade Seasalter, has told Ric that he recalls seeing Winston Churchill plus entourage on the little foot bridge on Preston Parade, viewing the newly installed gun battery, which was right in front of the house in about 1943.

 

J.M.W. Turner (1775–1851) described the famous sunsets along the North Kent coast as some of the best in the world and just like Turner, Ric also explores the unique atmospheres found in this area. He says:

“My work has as much to do with the changing weather; encompassing all sorts of environmental conditions, which can range massively from attractive and peaceful to threatening and dangerous,  as well as with the geographical location. Since moving into the late artist Dan Sherrin’s old cottage, I have set up my studio at the front of the house, which overlooks the sea. 

This has changed my working practice profoundly, as I now have a myriad of subject matter in front of me and I am less dependent on notes and colour sketches. I can now work directly on canvas from my subject and study in detail various sea states and “light events” which may have previously evaded me. It’s become possible to study storms in greater detail and track showers and their influence on the sea in some degree of comfort. Sadly, despite the house’s prominence and history, time and gravity has taken its toll, leaving it bereft of level floors, so when I first moved in, the horizon appeared to lean when looking out from my studio!”

Recently, in February 2024 another artist, internationally acclaimed sculptor Jason deCaires Taylor has installed an activist group of people outside The Old Neptune Pub on West Beach called Sirens of Sewage. Originally intended for placement in a tidal area along the adjacent coastline, the project encountered resistance from local authorities and is now situated on private land less than 10 away from Ric’s studio, and well worth visiting. 

This painting is sold but cards and prints available.

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